Healthy Eating for True Vitality

The beginning of a new year gives us all a chance for a fresh start. Many of us establish goals and make resolutions (myself included!). We want to be healthy. We want to feel good. And we want to look good. Many people start a diet in the New Year and for most of us, this is a step in the right direction. But for some people, “healthy eating” can become rigid and restrictive or turn out of control. Either way, it can become quite the opposite of healthy.

Consider asking yourself the following questions:

 Are you satisfied with your eating patterns?

 Do you ever eat in secret?

 Does your weight affect the way you feel about yourself?

 Have any members of your family suffered with an eating disorder?

 Do you currently suffer with or have you ever suffered in the past with an eating disorder?

If you answered yes to one or more of these questions, you may suffer from some form of disordered eating. Eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder can be easily overlooked until the physical consequences catch up with the individual. Meanwhile, disordered eating robs the person of joy and vitality through the emotional experience of living with an eating disorder. The stereotype of a person with an eating disorder is a thin young woman, but eating disorders effect people of all ages, races and body types, including men. There are a host of medical complications; eating disorders have a negative effect on every body system but can be particularly detrimental to the cardiac, nervous and digestive systems.

If you have concerns about yourself or a loved one, may I suggest an appointment at Nature Cures Clinic for an evaluation? We can help set you on a path to real health and vitality. For more information on eating disorders, check out the National Anorexia and other eating disorders website: http://www.anad.org/get-information/about-eating-disorders/eating-disorders-statistics/

 

 

References

Cotton, M, Ball, C, Robinson, P. (2003). Four Simple Questions Can Help Screen for Eating Disorders. Journal of General Internal Medicine. Accessed January 8, 2018 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1494802/