Vitamin D – We Can’t Say It Enough

We’ve told you before how sufficient levels of Vitamin D can help reduce your risk of many chronic diseases, including cancer, heart disease, depression and diabetes.

While these are all very serious conditions that deserve your attention, there’s another ailment that’s dominating the headlines right now. You’ve heard it blasted in big letters — the FLU. And guess what? Study after study is showing that Vitamin D can help you battle that cold-weather illness too.

Think about it. Vitamin D is known as the “sunshine vitamin.” When the sun starts hiding during the summer months, people’s levels of Vitamin D go down. They start getting colds and the flu. Could there be a correlation?

Here’s a quick recap of studies that say there is a connection:

A study from April 2009 concluding that newborns with sufficient Vitamin D levels had lower risk of acute respiratory infections.

A study from September 2007 finding that men who had less-than-optimal levels of Vitamin D missed more work due to illness than their peers who had sufficient levels. Additionally, the smokers in that study group tended to have lower levels of Vitamin D.

So how do you know whether you are getting enough Vitamin D? That’s where we can help. Optimal levels are usually between 50-80 ng/ml. Nature Cures Clinic hosts an ongoing Blood Analysis workshop that takes a look at what’s in your blood. We are also happy to assess your levels during a one-on-one session.

Flu season is upon us, so it’s important to know where you’re at in terms of vitamin levels. You can also give your immune system a boost by making sure you are drinking enough water, (half your body weight in ounces), getting enough sleep, and keeping your stress levels in check.

Call our clinic today to schedule an appointment, or feel free to email us at questions@naturecuresclinic.com to find out more.

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This entry was posted on Tuesday, September 29th, 2009 at 11:18 pm and is filed under Articles by our Providers, Homepage Articles (old site). You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.